Tag Archives: sliders

Off the Mark at Marks

I’ve come to the conclusion that the greatness in sliders exists in theory, not execution. Typically, they fail on one of two counts and if you are in a particularly underwhelming establishment, both.

The first is the all grease variety. There’s nothing to these to the point where you think you can down 10 of them and when you do, you find yourself yearning for the fetal position. The other begs that iconic 80s question, “Where’s the beef?” It’s all bun with a thinnest of slider.

Maybe it’s the novelty of shrinking down things – see tea cup pigs and the fact that the Honey I Shrunk the Kids franchise turned out four movies. Or it could be that the place we associate most with sliders – White Castle – revels in quantity or quality and is ingrained in pop culture thanks to Harold, Kumar, and Neil patrick Harris.

All that notwithstanding, I still go for a slider because it is the quintessential cheap eat. The time in one’s life where you learn to truly appreciate cheap eats is college. So it is no surprise that Mark, Number 98 on the list, is smack dab between the New School, Cooper Union, and NYU.

Mark DinnerStashed along a St. Marks that combines NYU undergrads, tourists from all overs, the last guard of the old East Village, and the gentrifying class – this clash is evidenced in the technicolor storefronts.

It wasn’t intended at the time but Mark was dinner both nights on a recent weekend. Even though it is located on a busy stretch, Mark, a sliver of a restaurant that could easily keep you coming back with its flashes of potential, in the end, is more disappointing than rewarding.

The strongest argument in Marks’ favor is their regular slider. If this is all they offered, this review would be far more favorable. The right balance of patty and bun, the meat tastes freshly ground and has just a touch of pink to it. The bun is lightly toasted and it’s clear the melted cheese wasn’t just tossed on.

The wheels come off when you go astray on the menu – with the exception of the pulled pork slider.

I actually went back to Mark the day after my first visit because I was hoping that I had accidentally been given two regular sliders instead of my order of one regular and bacon slider. That is how non-existent the bacon on the bacon slider is. On my second visit, when my food arrived, I removed the bun and saw two small bits of bacon ground into the sldier. Far from enough to warrant the name.

On that first visit, I ordered the fries and Guinness Shake. The fries are a big part of the potential/disappointment issue at play with Marks. The vinegar flavoring gives these salted flies a distinctive taste. Too many of them were crispy and lacking potato on the inside that it was clear that something was amiss. Credit though for a variety of condiment sauces for the fries – ketchup (natch), barbeque (appreciated), chipolte (unexpected), and jalapeno (a nice touch).

For $7, one might expect the Guinness Shake to taste like a Guinness. There’s a hint of stout to the shake and even without the simalcrum of Guiness, it is not only tasty in its own right, but leagues better than the Black & White. If you had blindfolded me, I would have thought that Sunday’s Black & White shake was mostly whip cream with some chocolate syrup doused in for good measure.

The Pulled Pork Slider gives you way more pulled pork than you’ve paid for but there is a part of me that quibbles with calling it a slider. Is there a rule that a slider needs to be a patty of ground beef of some sort. Am I being too originalist in this construct? Not that a place that bills itself as a slider joint shouldn’t be able to sell a mini-pulled pork sandwich. But, maybe just a little more truth in the advertising? Second best “slider” on the menu.

I get the appeal of Mark. It is most definitely cheap. It is probably better than most other joints along St. Marks. And there is something ingrained in some folks – myself included – that draws us back to the slider even if it fails to deliver more often than not. Will I make a point of going to the Mark the next time I walk by? No. Will I probably find myself there at the end of a night of drinking, looking for some food for the subway ride back to Brooklyn? I wouldn’t bet against it.

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